At The Met: Voyages - The Journey of the Magi & Glories of Medieval Art: The Cloisters

JourneyMagiCloisters_StoreDVDCover.jpg
JourneyMagiCloisters_StoreDVDCover.jpg
sold out

At The Met: Voyages - The Journey of the Magi & Glories of Medieval Art: The Cloisters

from 24.95

This DVD features the following two programs from the archives of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

The Journey of the Magi has inspired artists for over 2,000 years. At The Met: Voyages - The Journey of the Magi recreates their actual route, setting the event into both its cultural and archaeological contexts. As sites in the journey of the Wise Men are seen, artifacts and coins dating from the period provide additional insight into an historic event which has generated a wealth of art.

30 min. / English / Color / ©1989 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Glories of Medieval Art: The Cloisters features The Metropolitan’s branch museum devoted to art created during the Middle Ages. Philippe de Montebello, former Director of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, escorts viewers through an ensemble of spaces and gardens that evoke the medieval period - from the massive and strong Romanesque period to the light elegance of the Gothic style. The famed Unicorn Tapestries, illuminated manuscripts by the Limbourg brothers, brilliant stained glass windows, Robert Campin’s Annunciation Altarpiece, and scores of precious objects housed in the newly refurbished Treasury are some of the highlights seen in this program.

27 min. / English / Color / ©1983 ABC Enterprises, Inc.

Home or Institutional:
Buy DVD

At The Met: Voyages - The Journey of the Magi

Studios: ABC Video Enterprises, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Producer/Director: Philip Gittelman
Editorial Associate: Dierdre Evans Gittelman

Glories of Medieval Art: The Cloisters

Executive Producer: Karl Katz for the Office of Film and Television at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Producers/Directors: John Goberman and Marc Bauman
Host: Philippe de Montebello

Glories of Medieval Art: The Cloisters was made possible by a grant from The David H. Koch Charitable Foundation and The Affiliates of the Office of Film and Television at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.